Social Cohesion

Q&A

Q1: I am a Syrian refugee, and I would like to know whether I can work in Lebanon?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians
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Syrians are allowed to work in Lebanon if they get a work permit (see Q6) and only in the following sectors: Agriculture, Cleaning, Common Worker, Construction sector and its derivatives, Salesperson/Commercial representative, Marketing representative, Tailor, Mechanic & Maintenance, Blacksmithing and upholstery, warehouse – keeper, Guard.

Locations: National
Q2: What types of training opportunities exist to learn new skills?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians, Palestine Refugees from Syria, Host Communities, Lebanese Returnees
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UNHCR and other humanitarian organizations have set up a network of livelihood and community development centres across Lebanon (see Annex for livelihood centres and Annex for community development centres in the Social Cohesion and Livelihood section). These centres offer a wide range of skill building activities. This includes English, computer, financial literacy, hairdressing, beadwork, block printing, sewing, first aid, etc. You can also suggest that specific training be carried out at these centres. These centres can also run information sessions on the right to work and other issues of interest to you. Livelihood centres offer advanced activities for income-generation, while community centres are limited to basic life-skills and awareness sessions.

Locations: National
Q3: What happens after the training?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians, Palestine Refugees from Syria, Host Communities, Lebanese Returnees
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After learning a skill, you can approach the livelihood centres further. These centres offer advanced counseling and trainings on where to find a job, how to manage your finances, market your skills or products, prepare a resume, sit for a job interview, etc. They can also do job matching and link you with other entrepreneurs. Groups of women can get together and take out a loan for personal and income-generation use.

Locations: National
Q4: Who can benefit from such centres?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians, Palestine Refugees from Syria, Host Communities, Lebanese Returnees
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Everyone. All activities in the centres are open for Lebanese and Syrians, as well as other community members. Women, youth and older persons are encouraged to visit them, including persons living with disabilities. On a case by case basis, transportation and day care support can be provided with special attention to certain persons.

Locations: National
Q5: How can I find a job?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians, Palestine Refugees from Syria, Host Communities, Lebanese Returnees
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Community and Livelihoods Centres also provide job placement services. Get in touch with the Centre nearest you (see Annex for livelihood centres and Annex for community development centres in the Social Cohesion and Livelihood section). There is also short-term income generating opportunities offered through local and international organisations throughout the country. These opportunities are made public in the local community. Ask your municipality if they are aware of any such programme currently ongoing in your municipality.

Locations: National
Q6: How can I get a work permit?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians
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Work permits are delivered by the Ministry of Labor. There are specific procedures for Syrians to get a work permit (for the specific sectors listed above). Syrians can apply for a work permit from inside Lebanon and do not need to pay a deposit. The fees are also lower than for other foreigners. A number of documents are required: Employment contract certified form public notary; Copy of re-entry and exit permit; Certificate from the Syrian Embassy; Copy of ID or passport; Copy of ID of Company Owner; Employment registry record; National Social Security Fund (NSSF) registry record; 2 photos.

Locations: National
Q7: We face tensions in our community. What support can we get to improve the relationships and reduce the tensions?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians, Palestine Refugees from Syria, Host Communities, Lebanese Returnees
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Several communities offer possibilities for individuals and groups to come together and talk about matters that cause dispute and tension. Those services are offered through municipalities, community centres or schools. There is also self-standing initiatives set-up by humanitarian organisations to mediate between individuals and groups.

Locations: National
Q8: I have a problem with a Syrian/Lebanese, what can I do?
Applies to: Registered Syrian Refugees, Non Registered Syrians, Palestine Refugees from Syria, Host Communities, Lebanese Returnees
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If you feel that you cannot solve the problem peacefully with the person in question, you should refer it to the local authorities (municipality, police, or security forces) or with your local community leader and let them try to mediate the situation.

Locations: National
Q9: Why is all the assistance going to refugees?
Applies to: Host Communities
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A lot of the humanitarian assistance also benefits Lebanese and host communities. 252 Community Support Projects (CSP) have been implemented since 2011 to support host communities. Host communities also benefit from assistance rehabilitating schools, water network, or shelters. In total, it is estimated that 25% of the humanitarian assistance benefits host communities. Moreover, most in need Lebanese have access to assistance provided by the government, primarily through the National Poverty Targeting Programme.

Locations: National
Q10: My community would like to benefit from a Community Support Project (CSP). How can we qualify?
Applies to: Host Communities
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It is important to get in touch with your municipality and discuss your project idea with them. Community Support Projects (CSP) aim to improve community relations among Lebanese and refugees. CSPs should be developed with all persons that are concerned by the project.

Locations: National

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Leaflets & Posters

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Health services for refugees and asylum seekers in Lebanon
Target
All Countries except Syria, All Refugees & Asylum Seekers (except PRS), Non-Registered Syrians, Registered Syrian Refugees
by UNHCR   UNHCR